This Week I Learned 2018 - Week 41

Last week post or rather, old stuff from the archive.

Do we have an obsession with home ownership? (via /r/malaysia) While the discussion was referring to fresh graduates who are started out, the general rule of thumb still applies for everyone. Don't buy a house if you don't intend to stay more than ten years. Or don't buy houses 3 times more than your annual salary. Never equal home ownership like status symbol (just like car), you're taking a huge financial risk and long term repayment period. Another approach is to start small buy buying a low cost flat, stay in it, rent it, and sell it to buy a better house.

Judging by the current trend through NAPIC (National Property Information Centre), it's best to rent and wait before buying. Furthermore, the saving from your monthly mortgage installment into other investments will out weight the interest paid and potential capital appreciation of your property. By the time you're ready for retirement, might as well move to some where outskirts and rent again and live off the dividends of your investment in your golden years. Off course, if you're planning to get marry and owning a home is crucial to satisfy your SO and in-laws (another status symbol issue), first time homeowner can apply through PR1MA, which was created to prevent wealthier people from inflating the housing prices.

Now, instead of taking advice from armchair experts in the forum, why not do your own calculation using the The New York Times' rent or buy calculator.

Ignore this discussion if you're one of those crazy rich Asians.

And by the way, there have been quite a discussion where the upcoming Budget 2019 will have an impact of the housing prices. We will wait and see then.

Do you need a bigger house? No. We spend majority of our times in the kitchen, living room, and bed room. Perhaps a SOHO (Small Office Home Office) suite is a preferable choice if you don't have kids or big family.

How many ways to refresh a page in Google Chrome? Three. Only if you've open the Chrome Dev Tools and right click the refresh button as shown in the screenshot below illustrates this. Now, what are the differences between these three refreshing methods?  Normal reload will use re-validate and use cache files when needed. Hard reload will skip the cache and re-download everything again. As the name implies, empty cache and hard reload will clear the cache file and re-download everything.


What the fsck with Perl's constant? Besides the default `use constant` pragma, we have 21 (yes, bloody 21 ways) Perl's modules to deal with constant or readonly values. Worse still, none of these modules satisfy the needs of proper constant usage, it's a case by case basis. The recommended one is Const::Fast. More on this in coming posts.

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