This Week I Learned 2018 - Week 46

Last week post or something else from the past instead.

What I say to people who are looking for a job? (via HN) Is not about job hunting but a good step-by-step guide on identifying on what you want to do with your life or career instead. The advice is useful to evaluate the reality of what you think you love to do and actually doing it for a long period of time. Very much suitable for fresh graduates who don't know what they want to do with their life. For example, most young people with some programming knowledge dream to be a game developer but once they start building their first game, the initial passion will die down and most will quit after a while. Maybe they don't have the lack of right exposure, support, and environment. Nevertheless, passion, interest, and enthusiasm varies from person to person.

Meanwhile, if you had two months off between jobs what would you be doing? Do nothing but eat, sleep, shit, and repeat (just to unwinding) or travel (not the usual tourist type trip but maybe solo trip). Or go through your long postponed someday list and finally pick something up and pursuit it. Perhaps, "work" as usual but at home doing your thing as usual.

What is like to survive a month without computer? (via HN) He is not the first who tried this before, someone else did it for two months, and another one, a year without Internet. We're left wonder what it's like without any exposure to any electronic devices these days. Can we survive a day without our mobile phone? Doubt so for most people these days. Can you imagine the anxiety of not having your phone next to you? It used to be a norm last time. At the end of the digital sabbath, the author felt that it's not that special or spiritual as he hoped. He did, however, recommend that instead of two months, try digital detox or going analogue for two weeks.

Similarly, Vipassana retreat is harder and requires more mental power but maybe too extreme for most people. Another approach, Mauna, the practicing observing the silence is worth trying as well. For us mere mortal, start small. Away from any digital devices or Internet during the weekend. Off everything after 6pm during the weekday. Start from there, slowly but surely.

I've been investigating digital detox for quite some time and implement some of these strategies with moderate success and failure. Still, more adjustments needed as we're trying different approaches.

Is "not doing anything at all is the most productive thing you can do"? Boredom may be good for your creativity. As they said, "an idle mind is the devil's workshop". If you're stuck with a problem do something else not relevant and does not engage your brain. You subconscious mind will do all the works. I was wondering what if we dont do nothing and just stay in a very quiet place, where you have nothing else to do except engaging and confront your own thoughts, will you go crazy? Yes, in 45 minutes, in the world quietest place.

Do you know how Red Hat was initially funded? 8 credit cards with a debt of 50k. Crazy as it sounds but it seemed this was quite common practices for business that can't get proper loans. The sales of Red Hat to IBM did pinque some interests on its founders and humble beginning (via HN). While I believe they should have use apt as the package manager instead of reinventing another subpar package manager, rpm. They have proven themselves to be the most successful companies or poster boy of FOSS world.

How do you keep track of the articles you want to read? Instead of overwhelmed yourself with pending reading list, the best approach is just "now or never". Why put off when you can do it today? If any articles are important enough or worth your attention, read it now. If you have more then 10-plus tabs opened, then you're setting yourself up for information overload. Often, we save too many articles but never get the chance to read it. Most of these articles are mildly interesting and should be put it someday anyway.

Is there anything else like Memepool? Yes, we have Useful Interweb, "which brings only the best links every day".

What is the worse code base you've seen so far? Oracle Database 12.2. The insight shared by an ex-employee did shed some lights on maintaining extremely large legacy software project, in this case, a database management system. While this mess can traced back to overseas Indian team but US team should shares the blame as well. However, it was mess to start with in the first place. And, as usual, there is always a xkcd comic to describe such insane scenario.

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