Showing posts with label goby. Show all posts
Showing posts with label goby. Show all posts

UMT MOOC: Ornamental Fish Culture - Topic 7: Seed Production - Larval Rearing - Carassius auratus, Goldfish

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Carassius auratus or commonly known as Goldfish is one of the most popular ornamental fish in the world. We have discuss about the quality characteristics and numerous species. As with most fishes, feeding should be done in delicate manner in larvae stage as fishes at the stage are too fragile and sensitive to sunlight.

Goldfish have preference for live feed for all stages of its life cycle. Artemia nauplii or Brine Shrimp is suitable for fry and Mosquito larvae, for fingerling, juvenile, and adult. For best optimal growth, for the first 14 days, feed with Artemia nauplii. For the next 14 - 21 days, feed with a mix of Artermina nauplii and dry feed (Source: Comparison of the nutritional status of goldfish (Carassius auratus) larvae fed with live, mixed or dry diet). When the fish reach juvenile or adulthood stage, 21 days after post-hatching, live feed as such Mosquito larvae is economically cheaper and suitable due to its high protein content.


For feeding frequency, twice per day is optimal for body weight gain (Source: Influence of Feeding Frequency on Growth performance and Body Indices of Goldfish (Carrassius auratus)).

UMT MOOC: Ornamental Fish Culture - Topic 7: Seed Production - Larval Rearing - Elacatinus figaro, the Barber Goby

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Elacatinus figaro, also known as Barber Goby due to its body pattern which similar to Barber's pole. This marine species is commonly found in coastal Brazil quite popular as ornamental fish for a reef tank. There are several Goby species, each with its unique patterns, body shapes, and colours as shown below.


Breeding Barber Goby is similar to most fishes except with a few adjustments. Due to its small size, even for adult, a 20 litres glass aquarium is sufficient enough for a breeding tank. As larvae are sensitive to light, we must cover the tank with black sheet to reduce exposure. For the first 3 days, do not do water change as the larvae is too fragile and do 30% water change after that period. Feeding wise, for the first day 0 - 25, use Nannochloropsis Oculata (a type of algae) with Brachionus Rotundiformis (a type of Zooplankton commonly known as rotifier) as first food. For the transition period, from day 18 - 30, use Nauplii and meta-nauplii of Artemia (common known as Brine Shrimp). Once the fries metamorphosis to juveniles, post 30 days, transfer to a growing or nursery tank.