Showing posts with label interview. Show all posts
Showing posts with label interview. Show all posts

This Week I Learned - 2016 Week 40

Last week post or the whole series.

My sentiments exactly. See comment below regarding chasing fad in technology development and especially PHP programming language. Do I actually miss PHP? Not really. But I think most of the web development systems still can be solved using PHP-based solutions. Barrier of entry to web development using PHP still the best choice.
Incidentally, this isn't unique to the front-end. I've seen the same thing happen with the SQL->ORM->Mongo->Couch->SQL nonsense, or the myriad of templating engines written for PHP, a language that itself is a templating engine.

Using Node.js? Need a basic system with essential features to bootstrap your system? Look no further than Hackarthon Starter.

The difference between Ponzi, Pyramid, and Matrix Scheme. A lot of young people, especially fresh graduates need to aware and prevent themselves from falling for such scams. The pitch of being your own boss or retire early may sounds too good to be true.

Sometimes the documentation written for a certain API, Data::ICal was so confusing that you have to resolve to searching source code written by others using the same API itself at here, here, here, and here. Can't blame the API author as the standard itself, RFC 5455 is as confusing and complicated.

Google Interview University (via HN). Instead of working for a company, why not strive to work with great people instead? Google is so big and not every team is equal. Agree with one of the comment, this is a good compilation of resource for computer science study. Which reminds me again of the Programmer Competency Matrix. Instead of focusing on the computer science stuff, why not focusing on building stuff? Someone needs to read the interview of famous programmers on their background.

Getting older but still enjoy working as a programmer? Read Reflections of an "Old" Programmer, especially the comments from the blog post itself, HN, and Reddit. The main question here is how do you age gracefully as a programmer? Lifelong learning, especially the fundamentals (the core of computer science, not latest greatest fad frameworks), as those things never changed. I blogged about this last year, during my career detour as a non-programmer role, still technical though.

Didn't realize that to use PowerTop properly, first you will need to calibrate it after installation to collect measurement data. The whole process will take a while and networking will be disabled during that period.
$ sudo apt-get install powertop
$ sudo powertop --calibrate
$ sudo powertop --auto-tune

Besides that, you can turn off unwanted running services to save a bit more battery.
$ service --status-all

Upgrade to LXD 2.3 failed to due a spelling bug in bridge network upgrade script. Fixing the bug manually and restart the installation process again.
$ sudo apt-get install -f

However, new container created don't have a default network bridge. Re-enable this resolved the issue.
$ lxc network attach lxdbr0 test-alpine
$ lxc restart test-alpine

This Week I Learned - 2016 Week 39

Last week post or the whole series.

The month of October have started. As we're closing in to the end of year 2016, I've still have long list of pending items to follow up. Sometimes, is best to take break, reflecting on the current situation, and re-prioritize your short and long term goals. Nevertheless, there is one thing for sure, regardless the outcome, discipline is one sure way to get closer to what you want to achieve.

Interesting stuff I've learned this week.

Few days back, I've managed to finish the book Modern Perl. I bought and starting reading the book on 25th June and finished it by 30th September. It took me roughly 98 days to wrap up the whole book page by page (not a good strategy according to How to Read a Book). My impression? Not a beginner book and not quite a suitable book for any developer switching from other languages. It's more like a reference book on how to code according to the Modern Perl convention. The correct sequence of Perl books to read are as follow:

Language FundamentalsReferences
Learning Perl
Intermediate Perl
Mastering Perl
Programming Perl / the "Camel book"
Modern Perl

While we're in the discussion on book. I'm quite disappointed with Eloquent Javascript. Someone suggested that I should look into `You Don't Know JS` book series instead. Maybe I should try it out instead. It's currently the next item in my reading list.

Again, on Javascript. There is an annoying behaviour of using Array with Object. Seriously? I was caught surprised by this.

On a related note, the popularity of Javascript leads to an issue of Same-origin policy where it's not permitted to request a resource from different domain. The Cross-Origin Resource Sharing (CORS) is a specification to resolve this. Solution exists for different popular web servers with support from different web browsers. For example, how to resolve this matter in Cloudfront.

Life as a Middle-Aged Geek (via HN). The advantage of being a middle-age developer is you probably know what you want or don't want out of your life. As time is catching up and you have plenty of life commitments elsewhere, if better you should constantly review and revise your own life goals. While ageism is an ongoing issue with technology sector, the Old Geek Jobs site was created for those developers whose are (35 and beyond). Or you can be an indie hacker instead?

Look-and-say sequence. Quite an interesting integer sequence, useful when you want to setup a new Wifi password but at the same time, want to confuse the hell of your users.

TLD used for local development? Mine is still using `.dev` but you must be aware that `.dev` is a generic Top Level Domain (gTLD).

Differences between Ansible's `command` and `shell` usages and when to use it. It seems I need to rewrite most of my dotfiles' steps. Didn't realize that `ansible-lint` actual exists.

What are the software stacks or cool tools used in the startup scene?

How to hire a programmer? While technical skills is a crucial requirement, cultural fit and attitude are equivalent important as well. But, as the article mentioned, nothing is guaranteed.

Hiring New Developers

"Once we've received the code, we review it for the above stated qualities with an emphasis on clean, readable and well-tested code. We're not too hard on these code reviews, we just want to try to eliminate obviously poor fits. People who write no tests are immediately eliminated. Hugely over-architected solution? Eliminated. Code is bad enough the person might not actual be able to program? You get the idea."
-- prophetjohn, emphasis mine
So their procedures of hiring a new developers are:

1. Send a sample coding project.
2. Check for tests, not over-engineered code, and the ability to code.
3. Coding interview with real project (something the company is current working on). Pair-up code review and refactoring with existing developers.
4. Informal group interview by the developer team.